Public Speaking Articles

Virtual Master Presenter

Great presenters get feedback from other advanced presenters to work on the subtleties of their presentations. When was the last time you worked on refining your virtual presentation skills? You’ll get refinements in the eSpeakers’ Virtual Master Presenter live virtual course and designation facilitated by me. It starts on February 6, 2023. Register: bit.ly/es-vmp

How to Overcome Challenges of Public Speaking: Tips and Tricks

Let’s face it: Public speaking can be a difficult feat. Whether you’re presenting a project in a college lecture or you’re interested in pursuing a career that involves getting in front of large groups of people, there are hurdles to overcome before you can speak with poise and confidence. 

So what exactly are the most common challenges, and how can you overcome them? Let’s take a closer look.

Common Challenges of Public Speaking

For some, public speaking comes easy. For others, it can feel overwhelming – like the hardest thing in the world to achieve. People who lack public speaking skills may relate to one or more of the following challenges:

  • Anxiety and fear of speaking in front of a crowd. Some have a fight-or-flight response when it comes to public speaking. This can have a big impact on confidence and make it difficult to deliver a speech without the audience noticing the anxiety. 
  • Little to no structure in the presentation. If you go into a speech without a plan, you may be more likely to fumble over your words or miss the point of the presentation altogether. 
  • Having no credibility with your audience. Establishing credibility and trust before you give a speech is essential. Without it, the audience may walk away feeling like they’ve wasted their time. 
  • Displaying poor body language. Bad body language can also impact how the audience feels about your presentation. If your audience can tell that you don’t want to be there, they might be able to find value, depth, or meaning in your words. 
  • Delivering a speech without a clear message. Getting tangled in your own thoughts while delivering your speech can result in confusing the audience. 

With more awareness of these common challenges, you can work through them and make public speaking a more exciting and enjoyable experience for yourself and your audience. 

Woman standing at podium covering her face with her presentation notes

Tips for Learning How to Speak in Public

Want to overcome your fear of performance anxiety? Here are a few tips for overcoming those common challenges. 

1. Establish Trust with Your Audience

Learning how to establish credibility in a speech ensures that you can connect with your audience and deliver a strong message. 

But how do you establish credibility with your audience? Start by speaking with an authoritative voice. Work on your body language and keep eye contact. Let the audience know that you know what you’re talking about. 

Speak with honesty, and make it known that you understand your audience as well. The last thing you want to do is undermine their intelligence – your audience deserves the same amount of respect as you expect. 

2. Work on Your Confidence

If you tell yourself you’re a bad public speaker, you’ll never have room to grow and become a great one. Confidence is key when it comes to speaking in front of a large audience, especially if you have stage fright. Work on your public speaking anxiety by practicing deep breathing and keeping positive thoughts in your mind ahead of your presentation. 

3. Get Organized in Advance

Practice, practice, practice. You may start to feel more anxious the closer you get to speak in front of your audience, but getting yourself organized can help you feel more confident and ease your fear of public speaking. 

4. Nail Down the Reason Behind Your Speech

The last thing you want to do is deliver a speech that’s open-ended. Ensure the message behind your presentation is well-established before you get in front of the audience. This may involve scrapping one idea for another and may also involve lots of practicing beforehand, but the time investment will work in your favor. 

5. Learn From the Best 

Learning how to overcome the challenges of public speaking and establishing credibility in your speeches may be difficult at first. If you’re having trouble getting confident and need more exposure to great speeches, check out the eSpeakers marketplace

This is your go-to resource for learning about professional public speakers and how they started before making a career out of presenting to large audiences. This can give you a better idea of how to get started and boost your confidence before you give a presentation.

Browse the eSpeakers marketplace today to learn from the best!

Culture, it’s the competitive advantage that differentiates great companies from good ones. (ft. Frank Ward, Founder, and CEO of Altered Image)

According to Frank Ward, President and CEO of Altered Image, an esteemed communication and production agency, culture is the competitive advantage that differentiates great companies from good ones. His company has been around for over 40 years, and he credits its longevity to a culture where his employees are encouraged to operate– not from a place of fear– but from a place of fun.

In this week’s episode of No More Bad Events, Frank talks about that and about how putting the right people, and enough of them, in place at an event is the solution for only the best events.

You can tune in here (Apple podcast link in comments) or wherever you find your favorite podcasts. #NoMoreBadEvents is produced and presented by eSpeakers, the premier full-service platform for event professionals. Thanks to Frank Ward for joining the conversation. And thanks to our amazing podcast host Scott Bloom.

No More Bad Events website

No More Bad Events on Apple Podcast

#podcast#podcasting#podcasthost#meetingprofs#meetingsandevents#eventprofs#mpi #eventprofessionals#hospitalityindustry#hospitality

5 Tips on How to Overcome Stage Fright in Public Speaking

Public speaking comes easy for some but is difficult for others. If you find public speaking to be intimidating, you’re not alone. In fact, according to research by the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, between 15% and 30% of the general population have social anxiety, which can have a significant impact on the ability to get in front of a large (or small) crowd and give a presentation. 

Of course, there are different ways to manage your social anxieties and overcome your public speaking fear. With the right strategies in place, you can feel more comfortable and confident opening up during meetings at work, presenting in school, or leading a conference for colleagues. 

Whether you need encouragement in the workplace or you’re pursuing your dream of becoming a professional public speaker, there are dozens of ways to settle your nerves and boost your confidence. Here are five tips on how to deal with stage fright public speaking:

Concept of stage fright with blurry image in front of a podium

1. Prepare and Practice, Practice, Practice

One of the easiest ways to fuel your public speaking anxiety is to come to your presentation underprepared. You can help mitigate feelings of nervousness and fear when you approach your audience with confidence, knowledge, and organization. Here are a few different ways to prepare for a public speaking event:

  • Do your research. The last thing you want to do is approach a topic like you’re an expert, then fall flat with the delivery. Set aside time to do thorough research on your speaking topic, so you don’t have to rely on your notes or a script so heavily. 
  • Get organized. Do you have all of your presentation items ready? Make sure you plan out your presentation props, audio, and visuals well in advance, so you don’t have to worry about fumbling around during the presentation. 
  • Practice! If you have a public speaking fear, it’s best not to wing it. Practice in front of a group of people, and practice alone in the mirror as well. Get a few different perspective angles on your presentation before the big day. 

2. Stay Focused on Your Presentation Material 

It’s easy to get on stage and feel overwhelmed by the number of people in the room. And it doesn’t have to be a large audience to feel this way, either. Try your best to pay less attention to the audience and more attention to the information you are presenting to them. 

If the idea of working through moments of silence brings you anxiety, consider this: these silent pauses can be intimidating during a presentation – especially if you’re the one who’s center stage – but they can also be very valuable. This gives you a chance to catch your breath and for the audience to reflect. Plus, when these moments occur, they likely won’t last longer than a few seconds (even if it feels like an eternity.) 

3. Practice Deep Breathing Exercises 

Deep breathing is an anxiety reducer that shouldn’t go unnoticed. Taking slow, deep breaths creates better airflow throughout your body, which can be pertinent to calming nerves, reducing stressors, and mitigating anxiousness. Work on your deep breathing exercises in advance of the presentation so that you understand how to manage your fears and get your breathing under control.

4. Seek Support 

Overcoming stage fright, and public speaking can be made easier with a support system. Reach out to co-workers, friends, and family members about your upcoming event and ask for general support and assistance practicing the presentation. This can help you overcome fears, feel more confident about your delivery, and make your loved ones proud. 

5. Browse eSpeakers Marketplace for Inspiration

Want to learn how to get over stage fright and public speaking from other public speakers? 

If you find yourself struggling to build confidence for an upcoming presentation, find inspiration from the professionals. eSpeakers marketplace is your go-to resource for learning about professional public speakers and how they started before making a career out of presenting to large audiences. This can be an encouraging way to face your fear of public speaking and feel more comfortable getting in front of an audience in the future. 

And once you feel comfortable with your own public speaking skills, you can even join the eSpeakers marketplace yourself! This space offers an opportunity to grow your public speaking business, pursue leads, gain more experience in the industry, and even boost your confidence.

Looking to hire a public speaker? Want to become one on your own? Browse eSpeakers today for more information.

Give the gift of eSpeakers!

Email sales@espeakers.com, and let us know you want to pay for the next year. Please include the name and email address of the person you want to gift 1-year of eSpeakers.

Make a fellow speaker’s holiday merry and their future bright with a 1-YEAR GIFT SUBSCRIPTION to eSpeakers. 

This is the real deal — a full year of eSpeakers service — free to a speaker you choose. But don’t delay: the offer ends on December 23, 2022.

How to Establish Credibility in Your Public Speeches: Tips and Tricks

A career in public speaking means being a strong-willed communicator. Understanding how to persuade your audience in a way that shows you have their best interest in mind, all while spreading your own message, is critical. Establishing credibility in persuasive speech allows you to build trust, enhance your reputation, and ultimately expand your book of business.

How Do You Establish Credibility With Your Audience?

Here are some simple tips and tricks on how to establish credibility in speech:

No More Bad Events: Science, Serotonin, and Saving the Hotel Industry (ft. Michael Dominguez, President & CEO of Associated Luxury Hotels International)

This episode features one of the top experts in the meetings industry. Not only is Michael Dominguez, CHSE, President & CEO of Associated Luxury Hotels International(ALHI) – a global sales organization known for its exclusive membership of the world’s most distinguished, independently operated, or owned hotels and resorts – but he’s a science guy. A self-proclaimed tech geek.
 
And he loves mixing science with human nature to create the best environments for mental acuity, alertness, and collaboration.
 
And in this episode of No More Bad Events, Michael shares with us some highly effective scientific-based tools that can make a better event; simply because the scientific effect will make people plugged in and feel good.
 
From how the use of the color and brightness of light in a meeting room suppresses or increases melatonin and serotonin. To how… serving Vitamin D enriched foods, replenishes and repairs… To how plants restore the air … it’s fun, fascinating, and phenomenal stuff.
 
You can tune in here or wherever you find your favorite podcasts (link below).
 
No More Bad Events is produced and presented by eSpeakers.com, the premier full-service platform for event organizers, and sponsored by ImpactEleven, a comprehensive speaker support service. Thanks to Michael Dominguez for joining the conversation and Scott Bloom for being the podcast host.
 
#podcasts #events #conferences #meetingprofs #eventprofs #ALHI #keynote #keynotespeaker #nomorebadevents

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No More Bad Events: Cruising with Carina Baur – Part 2

Last week, the long-awaited IMEX America show rolled into Las Vegas. And we got very lucky. We snagged Carina Bauer, CEO of the IMEX as our featured guest on No More Bad Events.

In this episode (Part II of a two-part podcast), Carina gives us more insight into what went into building the architecture for this award-winning show. From the overarching show concept… which was grounded in nature… to integrating gender-neutral devices… Carina waxes prolific on the myriad of micro-moments that were designed to provide experiences and inspiration for producing nothing but the best events.

The interview is followed by a bonus segment of IMEX attendee interviews that you won’t want to miss.

#NoMoreBadEvents is produced and presented by eSpeakers, the premier full-service platform for event organizers, and sponsored by ImpactEleven, a comprehensive speaker support service.